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News Feb 18, 2013 - 8:25:09 AM


Invasive Plants Council releases annual report

By Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection





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Connecticut’s Invasive Plants Council announced last week that its recently released 10th annual report is now available online. This report highlights actions undertaken in Connecticut to address problems caused by terrestrial and aquatic invasive plants. To view the full annual report, visit www.cipwg.uconn.edu/ipc.html and select “2012 Annual Report.” Activities and actions highlighted in the report include:

Continued coordination of water chestnut control and removal throughout the Connecticut River
Ongoing efforts to inform the public about threats from invasive plants and to gather information on new infestations
Continuation of efforts by the green industry (led by the Connecticut Nursery and Landscape Association) to phase out 25 of the highest-seed producing varieties of Japanese barberry by 2013
Evaluating new species for listing, including some species of running bamboo
Adding mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) to the list of potentially invasive plants in Connecticut

Several meetings included discussions about running bamboo. The Council examined occurrences of running bamboo found in Connecticut and consulted with experts in developing its position on the plant. The Council considered running bamboo’s potential to spread and determined that the plant did not meet the criteria for listing as an invasive or potentially invasive plant. However, the Council also recognized that bamboo causes significant problems for residential properties, and is recommending legislation that would address this issue from a non-invasive standpoint.

The Council is a nine member partnership established under statute in 2003 between state agencies, non-governmental organizations, academia, and industry. Primary functions include developing the state invasive and potentially invasive species lists, developing and providing educational materials and programs about invasive plants, and supporting state agencies in invasive plant efforts.

Additional activities of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) and other associated organizations, including the Connecticut Nursery and Landscape Association (CNLA), the Department of Agriculture (DoAg), the University of Connecticut and the Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group (CIPWG) are also included in the report.

To view the full annual report, visit www.cipwg.uconn.edu/ipc.html and select “2012 Annual Report”.




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