Magazine
Subscribe
Editorial
Media Kit
Talk to us

News : Health Aug 25, 2014 - 3:31:24 PM


New statin guidelines are an improvement, Yale study shows

By Yale University





Font size: Small Big
Email this article
 Printer friendly page
Share this article:
facebook del.icio.us Yahoo! MyWeb Digg reddit Furl Blinklist Spurl
Buy the "As seen on" mug
New Haven, CT - New national guidelines can improve the way statin drugs are prescribed to patients at risk for cardiovascular disease, a Yale University study has found.

The research, published Aug. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, also showed the new guidelines produce only a modest increase in the number of patients being given the drugs.

Statins are a class of drugs that help lower cholesterol by blocking the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase, which the body needs in order to produce cholesterol. Common statin medications include Lipitor, Levacor, Zocor, Pravachol, and Crestor.

In 2013, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology jointly published a new set of standards for the assessment of cardiovascular risk. The standards replaced the 2001 National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III recommendations.

“There has been a great deal of discussion about the new guidelines. People worry whether the new risk equation is accurate,” said Dr. Kevin M. Johnson, lead author of the study and associate professor of diagnostic radiology at the Yale School of Medicine. “They are concerned that too many people will be put on statins.”

Johnson and co-author Dr. David A. Dowe of Atlantic Medical Imaging, in Galloway, N.J., studied 3,076 subjects. They applied both sets of guidelines to determine whether patients would start statin therapy.

They found that the new guidelines did a better job of discriminating between patients with little or no plaque and those with more plaque. Of patients with heavy plaque, 92% would be assigned to statin therapy under the new method, but only 53% under the old standards.

The biggest difference between the two results, researchers said, was the use of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol targets under the old guidelines. The targets “seriously degraded the accuracy of the NCEP guideline for statin assignment,” according to the study.

“The old guidelines emphasized lowering LDL cholesterol to certain target values, but the new guidelines have done away with that approach,” Johnson said. “Many doctors are reluctant to give up targets.”

Overall, 15% more patients would be put on statins under the new guidelines — considerably fewer than some observers had predicted, he added.

The researchers noted that they used coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden as the determining factor in the study, rather than cardiac events. Further study will be necessary to evaluate the guidelines with outcome data.




© Copyright by StamfordPlus.com. Some articles and pictures posted on our website, as indicated by their bylines, were submitted as press releases and do not necessarily reflect the position and opinion of StamfordPlus.com, Stamford Plus magazine, Canaiden LLC or any of its associated entities. Articles may have been edited for brevity and grammar. Photos without a credit line are "contributed photos".




[an error occurred while processing this directive]




Note: We reserve the right to delete posts at any time if we decide that they are offensive or distasteful.
CURRENT HEADLINES:
Ferguson Library Trustees Choose New Library President
Stamford Downtown’s “Street Seats in Stamford Downtown” Auction
PPSNE Supports AAP Recommendations
CDC Confirms Additional Cases of EV-D68 in Connecticut
Hispanic Heritage Essay Contest/Open to MS and HS Students


Top of Page










StamfordPlus.com is part of the Canaiden Online Media Network.
Stamford Plus Online | Norwalk Plus Online | Canaiden.com | Best of Norwalk | Best of Stamford | Hauterfly Magazine | SummerCampPlus.com

Copyright ©2005-2010 Canaiden,LLC All Rights Reserved.